Water in Unused buildings during pandemic needs attention

While millions of people are under orders to stay home amid the coronavirus pandemic, water is sitting in the pipes of empty office buildings and schools, etc getting old and potentially dangerous.

When water isn’t flowing, organisms and chemicals can build up in the plumbing. It can happen in underused gyms, office buildings, schools, shopping malls and other facilities. These organisms and chemicals can reach unsafe levels when water sits in water pipes for just a few days. But, what happens when water sits for weeks or months?

There are no long-term studies of the risks and only minimal guidance to help building owners prepare their water for use again after a long shutdown.

Just like food that sits in a refrigerator for too long, water that sits in a building’s pipes for too long can make people sick.

Harmful organisms, like the bacteria that cause Legionnaire’s disease, can grow. If not maintained, devices like filters, water tanks, heaters and softeners can become organism incubators.

With certain pipe materials, water can accumulate unsafe levels of lead and copper, which can cause learning disabilities, cardiovascular effects, nausea and diarrhea.

Copper can leach from plumbing pipes and valves and Built up water can contain copper from pipes, which can cause illnesses if ingested.

Drinking this water is a problem, but infections can also result from inhaling harmful organisms. This occurs when water splashes and becomes an aerosol, as can happen in showers and pools and when flushing toilets or washing hands. Some of these organisms can cause pneumonia-like diseases, especially in people who have weakened immune systems.

Water inside a building does not have an expiration date: Problems can develop within days at individual faucets, and all buildings with low water use are at risk.

Keep the water flowing

To avoid water issues, “fresh” water must regularly flow to a building’s faucets.

Medical facilities, with their vulnerable populations, are required to have a building water safety plan to keep water fresh and prevent growth. Schools, which have long periods of low use during the summer, are advised to keep water fresh to reduce water’s lead levels.

The key thing to do here is to not let water sit in buildings.

If water isn’t being used in a building, intentionally flushing the building to replace all the old water with new water can be done at least weekly. It also helps remove sediments that accumulate along pipe walls.

Easier to avoid contamination than clean it up

For building managers who haven’t been running the water during the pandemic, the water sitting in pipes may already have significant problems. To perform flushing, safety equipment, including masks, currently in short supply, might be needed to protect workers.

A slow “ramp-up” of the economy means buildings will not reach normal water use for some time. These buildings may need flushing again and again.

Shock disinfection, adding a high level of disinfectant chemical to the plumbing to kill organisms living in it, may also be necessary. This is required for new buildings and is sometimes done when water in new buildings sits still for too long.

Cut-open shower pipes reveal a biofilm with metal deposits.
Building managers can test their water for bacteria and metal deposits.

Inexpensive chemical disinfectant tests can help determine if the water is “fresh.” Testing for harmful organisms is recommended by some organizations. It can take several days and requires expertise to interpret results. Metals testing might be needed, too. Public health departments can provide specific recommendations for all of these actions and communication of risks.

The need for standards and water safety

Water left sitting in the pipes of buildings can present serious health risks.

Standards are lacking and very much needed for restarting plumbing and ensuring continued water safety after the pandemic passes.

Right now, building managers can take immediate action to prevent people from becoming sick when they return. more  

View all 26 comments Below 26 comments
Still water produces "contact corrosion" in water pipes and this acts like slow poison. Especially in our country mostly non-galvanised pipes are installed and this shortens their lifetime. The golden rule is: water must continue to flow; stagnant water produces corrosion. Even stainless is not supreme, because it contains a certain percentage of Fe viz. iron. more  
The local authorities should regularly visit and take steps more  
I believe all these big buildings of schools, malls and the like will have an isolation valve and a drain valve. By closing this valve, that particular bldg can be isolated and the existing water in the pipes can be drained. Some chemicals can be used to halt/retard the corrosion process. This status can be kept as long as reqd. Before restoring the water supply the system can be flushed with fresh water and drained. This will preserve huge amount of water when compared to draining the fresh water every week. more  
Before returning to work, the building owners and concerned office management should ensure that the the stalled water is completely drained out and disinfectants are flown through the related storages and pipelines during initial few days. more  
This seem sto be a very significant post. Authorities need to think and remedial steps should be taken. Most possibly the "grander Technology" could be an immediate solution. This is a technology which uses the property of magnetism and natural water taken from about 5000 years old spring in Austria. Water containing heavy metal such as lead, mercury, cadmium etc are rendered less harmful when energized by this Living water Technology. more  
Post a Comment

Related Posts

    • Govt disappoints us - No hope to pollution issue

      the Central Government seems to have agreed to farmers demand to decriminalise stubble burning. What this means is that the pollution issue for us residents of Delhi NCR and many other N...

      By Anshu Verma
      /
    • Buy fewer clothes and wash them less

      Lifecycle assessments show—taking cotton production, manufacture, transport and washing into account— it takes 3,781 litres of water to make one pair of jeans. The process equates to ar...

      By Vinita Agrawal
      /
    • Air purifiers and Coronavirus - Columbia Professor Q & A

      Aerosol scientist Mecneal of Columbia Univ recently answered queries on whether HEPA filters work to purify air of coronavirus. Q. What’s a HEPA filter and can it catch particles ...

      By Vinita Agrawal
      /
    • Urban and Rural India challenges

      Urban India faces 3 huge challenges for decades to come. 1- Air pollution 2. Solid waste management. 3. Water pollution. Great wisdom, resources, research, techn...

      By Aditi Gupta
      /
    • Wake up People against pollution

      Most of India's rivers are dangerously polluted, water is not fit for consumption. Many north Indian cities air is dangerously polluted. 1.4 billion ppl are affected with such pollution.

      By Vinita Agrawal
      /
    • Stubble needs a solution

      My husband who knows the LocalCircles Founder Sachin Taparia got his video which so accurately describes via BBC the issue of stubble being the lead cause of Delhi pollution. The same also gets pro...

      By Shikha Chhabra
      /
    • Foam in our rivers and lakes

      Last year it was Bangalore lakes full of foam and today it is Delhi’s iconic Yamuna river. If this is not climate change, what is I dont know. Can we have a detailed di...

      By Vinita Agrawal
      /
    • Don’t light crackers today

      Our LocalCircles survey is suggesting only one third people will be burning crackers this Diwali

      By Vinita Agrawal
      /
    • Climate Emergency is Now

      Our PM has announced that India will be be Net zero by 2070. Do you really think NetZero by 2070 will help? Climate emergency is NOW - the devil lies in the details. What we do over next 20 years i...

      By Vinita Agrawal
      /
    • Punjab Farm Fires getting bad

      Consistent cloud and rain over India is both delaying agricultural waste burning and limiting the detection of these fires by satellite. Although the fire season this year is delayed compared to th...

      By Ruchika L Maheshwari
      /
    • Climate Change and Disaster Preparedness

      Untimely rains and floods, hail storms, earthquakes and tsunamis are all a result of what we are doing to the earth and specifically climate change. The so many knowledgeable people on L...

      By Anita Chaturvedi
      /
Share
Enter your email and mobile number and we will send you the instructions

Note - The email can sometime gets delivered to the spam folder, so the instruction will be send to your mobile as well

All My Circles
Invite to
(Maximum 500 email ids allowed.)