How do you treat anemia?

How do you treat anemia?

DEAR DOCTOR:
My teenage daughter recently learned that she has iron deficiency and anemia. Why would her iron be low? What is the treatment?
DEAR READER:
Anemia means that the blood does not have enough red blood cells. These cells carry oxygen from the lungs to the rest of the body. There are many kinds of anemia. In the United States, iron-deficiency anemia is the most common; it occurs when the body does not have enough iron to make red blood cells.
What’s the connection between iron and red blood cells? Inside every red blood cell is the protein called hemoglobin, which carries oxygen to every cell in your body. Oxygen is an essential source of energy to every cell.
Iron is a part of hemoglobin. Most of the iron in the body is in the hemoglobin (and a similar protein in muscle called myoglobin).
Iron enters our body in food and leaves the body primarily when we bleed. Bleeding causes the loss of red blood cells and a lot of iron. That’s why teenage girls are particularly susceptible to iron-deficiency anemia: They have begun to have monthly menstrual bleeding. Each month they lose blood and iron. If your daughter doesn’t eat enough iron-rich foods, she will gradually develop iron deficiency.
Symptoms of iron-deficiency anemia are not usually obvious unless the problem is severe or long-lasting. If that’s the case, symptoms may include pale skin, tiredness, dizziness, lightheadedness, headaches or ringing in the ears. The condition is diagnosed with a blood test.
Iron-deficiency anemia is usually treated with iron supplements, taken by mouth for several months. The doctor will do follow-up blood tests to make sure the anemia has gone away or at least is improving.
Iron is best absorbed when given between meals. Encourage your daughter to take her iron supplement mid-morning, between breakfast and lunch, or mid-afternoon, between lunch and dinner.
Vitamin C makes it easier for the body to absorb iron. But calcium makes it harder, so your daughter should not take her supplement with milk. It may work best taken with foods or drinks that are high in vitamin C such as fruits, vegetables and orange juice.
Warn your daughter not to take more than the recommended dose of iron, as higher doses can be dangerous. Some people are vulnerable to developing iron overload.
You should also try to increase the amount of iron-rich foods in your daughter’s diet. These include:
• lean meats, poultry and fish
• iron-fortified cereals, breads and pasta
• dried fruits (apricots, raisins, prunes)
• leafy green vegetables (spinach, collard greens, kale)
• whole grains (brown rice, wheat germ, bran muffins)
• beans, peas and nuts
• eggs
Teenage girls who have begun to have menstrual periods can help prevent iron-deficiency anemia by taking a multivitamin with iron. The Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) for iron is 8 milligrams (mg) per day for females ages 9 to 13 years, and 15 mg per day for females ages 14 to 18 years.
Iron deficiency in teenage girls is common, easily diagnosed and easily treated. Your daughter should be fine. more  

View all 7 comments Below 7 comments
Informative more  
what about papaya? People believe that papaya is not good for women and girls during menstruation? more  
Low Hb ,if not due to any infection in the body, can be easily treated with Bio-Chemical formula No. 1 which suits children in most of the cases. The dosages should be given as per age described on the medicine bottle. This may be tried for a couple of months. This should be given half an hour of each meals (Thrice or four times a day). I am sure there will be recovery from low Hb. more  
Vitamin D supplements should be taken by people who are mainly indoors and have joint pains . The real need for testing is debatable as Akhil pointed out. more  
Vitamin D is a commercial scam!! Please see below:-

Too Much Vitamin D from a Tanning Bed?
By Kelly Young
Edited by David G. Fairchild, MD, MPH, and André Sofair, MD, MPH
Clinicians should consider tanning bed use when evaluating patients with excessively high vitamin D levels, suggests a case report in theAnnals of Internal Medicine.

A 26-year-old white woman was referred to an endocrinology clinic because her serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level was above 339 nmol/L (the reference range is 75-185 nmol/L). She said she had minimal sun exposure and did not take supplements or consume inordinate amounts of dairy products.

She did, however, report using a tanning bed at least 3 times a week for the past 6 months. One month after being advised to stop tanning, her 25-(OH)D level had dropped to 182 nmol/L.


Apparent Vitamin D Deficiencies in Blacks: Protein Variant at Fault?
By Joe Elia

The apparently high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency among blacks may be an artifact of what form is measured clinically, according to a New England Journal of Medicine study.

Among a sample of some 2100 blacks and whites, mean levels both of total 25-hydroxyvitamin D and of vitamin D-binding protein were lower among blacks. Yet blacks had higher bone mineral densities than whites and similar levels of bioavailable vitamin D.

The explanation may lie with variation in a gene associated with vitamin D-binding protein. The variant more prevalent among blacks is associated with lower levels of the binding protein. (Whites with the variant protein also showed lower binding levels.)

The authors conclude that low levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D don't necessarily indicate a deficiency. Their results, they say, "call into question routine supplementation in persons with low levels of both total 25-hydroxyvitamin D and vitamin D-binding protein." They recommend that "to improve the determination of vitamin D status in diverse populations, [measuring the binding protein] will most likely need to be incorporated."

Too Much Vitamin D from a Tanning Bed?
By Kelly Young
Edited by David G. Fairchild, MD, MPH, and André Sofair, MD, MPH
Clinicians should consider tanning bed use when evaluating patients with excessively high vitamin D levels, suggests a case report in theAnnals of Internal Medicine.

A 26-year-old white woman was referred to an endocrinology clinic because her serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level was above 339 nmol/L (the reference range is 75-185 nmol/L). She said she had minimal sun exposure and did not take supplements or consume inordinate amounts of dairy products.

She did, however, report using a tanning bed at least 3 times a week for the past 6 months. One month after being advised to stop tanning, her 25-(OH)D level had dropped to 182 nmol/L. more  
Post a Comment

Related Posts

    • At the age of 80, what remedy is for constipation which is chronic, please suggest.

      By Bakul Chawra
      /
    • colonoscopy

      My father is advised by Doctors to go through colonoscopy. AIIMS has given a long date of appointment for diagnosis. Can anyone suggest the hospital where we can go for the same at a cheaper price....

      By Gourav Agraawal
      /
    • Misdiagnosis

      If a lab conducts a test and provides wrong diagnosis of a condition, what rights does a patient have to lawsuit this lab?

      By Shikha Jain
      /
    • Cancer patient treated by radiation therapy, can it be taken at the age of 85.

      By Bakul Chawra
      /
    • Doctors Reference for MRI

      If someone goes for an MRI and the center asks for a Doctors reference, does that mean the Doc is getting commission on that MRI, pls share.

      By Yash Jindal
      /
    • The Most Important Medical Test.

      The Most Important Medical Test Dr. Sudhir V. Shah M.D., D.M. (Neurology) Consultant Neurologist, Prof. And HOD, Neurology, V.S.G.Hospital, Ahmedabad. Director of Neurosciences, Sterli...

      By Raja Chandra
      /
    • A Guide to Hypertension.

      A Guide to Hypertension. Hypertension is another name for high blood pressure. It might seem confusing at first, but this condition is relatively easy to treat and highly manageabl...

      By Raja Chandra
      /
    • Thanks Dr Arpan Gandhi pl cover what are the most important tests one should go for after 60 and then if any test is found to be adverse the detailed further tests. Right now we go for Kidney, live...

      By Prakash Gurbuxani
      /
    • I have Neuropathy pain in my feet. What can I do to relieve it?

      I have Neuropathy pain in my feet. What can I do to relieve it? DEAR DOCTOR: I have neuropathy pain in my feet. What can I do to relieve it? DEAR READER: Neuropathy, or n...

      By Raja Chandra
      /
    • VITAMIN D

      Vitamin D is very important for the upkeep of bone and overall health. Lack of vitamin D in the body can make you a host for various chronic disease and infections. Vitamin D def...

      By Raja Chandra
      /
    • APPLE CIDER VINEGAR.

      Hippocrates, the father of medicine, used this amazing elixir as a natural antibiotic and antiseptic to heal patients as far back as 400 B.C.! In a Japanese study, participants who drank...

      By Raja Chandra
      /
Share
Enter your email & mobile number and we will send you the instructions

Note - The email can sometime gets delivered to the spam folder, so the instruction will be send to your mobile as well

Please select a Circle that you want people to invite to.
Invite to
(Maximum 500 email ids allowed.)