Recognize a Heart Attack Long Before it Happens.

Recognize a Heart Attack Long Before it Happens.

Heart attacks have been one of the leading causes of death in the US for many years, and very often, symptoms which could have been spotted well-in-advance go unnoticed. You may perhaps be familiar with the classic signs: a heavy sweat, clutching of the left arm, pain in the chest, and so on. But sometimes signs of a heart attack are not so obvious, particularly amongst women, who often don't seem to realize what's happening to them, or appreciate the seriousness of the situation, until it is too late.
Whatever the symptoms may be, do not wait until it's too late. Be aware of what changes are taking place in your body and take necessary precautions - being alert will help save a life, whether it be your own, or a friend's.



What is happening to the body in the process of a heart attack

During a heart attack, the supply of blood to the heart is suddenly blocked, usually by a blood clot, which happens due to the build-up of plaque in the coronary arteries. Consequently, this build-up causes a severe loss of blood supply to your heart, which then causes a heart attack.

There are two main types:
Sudden: A person may or may not have had any symptoms in the past. All of a sudden, plaque ruptures, which triggers a chain of events and a sudden heart attack.
Gradual: This results from a gradual progression of coronary disease. In these patients, an artery narrows over time. Once it has narrowed down to more than 70 percent, a number of warning symptoms will start to show, possibly even months ahead.

Therefore knowing the warning signs of a heart attack today, can help you or someone you know and love survive tomorrow. The sooner you recognize the symptoms and get treatment, the better.
The symptoms can occur for months or even longer sometimes, and the spectrum of symptoms is very wide.

Spot the signs well in advance

1. Difficulty breathing, especially a shortness of breath
When blood flow to the heart decreases, your lungs will feel the effect as well, as not enough blood gets pumped to your lungs, thus restricting your airflow and causing a shortness of breath. This can become an issue if you can't catch your breath even when sitting still and thus warrants an immediate check-up.

2. Constant tiredness and drowsiness
Restricted blood flow to the heart may give you an unshakable feeling of fatigue. This usually results from a sizable buildup of plaque in your arteries that carry blood both to and from your heart. This is concerning if you find it especially difficult to get up from your chair to go into the kitchen. Something this simple may feel as challenging as having to run a marathon.

3. Dizziness and lightheadedness
Poor blood circulation will limit your blood flow to the brain. Whilst dizziness and lightheadedness can be mistaken for many things, it is an especially common sign of a heart attack amongst women.

4. Breaking out into a cold-sweat and feeling weak
Suddenly breaking out into a cold sweat is another sign that should be taken seriously, particularly when paired with a feeling of weakness. This occurs because your arteries have continued to narrow, restricting the blood flow throughout the entire body.

5. Chest pressure and pressure in other parts of the body
Chest pressure is perhaps one of the most obvious symptoms of a heart attack and is often a clear indication that a heart attack is about to happen. However, most people tend to ignore the tight feeling or chest pain, believing that it is nothing serious. Women should pay particular attention to this feeling of pressure or mild discomfort if it occurs anywhere in the chest, not just on the left side where your heart is.
Feeling a mild to severe pain or sense of pressure in other parts of your body, such as your stomach, shoulder, arm, throat or jaw are symptoms which should not be ignored.

6. Cold and flu symptoms
People have also recorded the development of cold and flu symptoms prior to a heart attack. Symptoms of nausea and vomiting or stomach pain should also be looked upon with a watchful eye, particularly amongst women, who often mistaken these symptoms for indigestion or stomach flu. more  

View all 13 comments Below 13 comments
Very very useful tips. Thank you, Rajaji. more  
Very useful tips toidentify aheart related problem.thank you sir more  
Sir, For diabetic people it is said that most the the symptoms described by you are not felt. In that case how to diagnose angina, heart attack, brain attack? more  
Thanks for very useful information more  
thank you sir for excellent information. more  
Post a Comment

Related Posts

    • Long Covid symptoms (neurological)

      Most common symptoms of the post-COVID-19 neurologic syndrome reported from 3,762 participants were as follows. LocalCircles must check with people with long covid in India as to what they are expe...

      By Malvika N
      /
    • The only race is of survival

      My close friend (40) who died this week in Melbourne had covid 3 times. The first time wasn’t so bad, the second one knocked him around pretty badly, and the third time he died of it. We&rsqu...

      By Irene Willems
      /
    • Events happening

      Whether it is business or social events, they are happening across the country though cases are rising. Business media houses are organising them. Why is it that the desire to make money is so much...

      By Sangita Baruah
      /
    • By Nikita Goyal
      /
    • Supreme Court says vaccine not mandatory

      The Supreme Court today held so as no substantial data has been produced on record to show that the risk of transmission of COVID-19 virus from the unvaccinated persons are higher than from vaccina...

      By Shailesh Deshmukh
      /
    • Science vs Politics

      With BA.4 and BA.5 on the horizon and liver problems on the rise, we are soon to have an epic battle of science vs. politics in most countries around the world. Most politicians have dr...

      By Shikha Mittal
      /
    • Discipline

      Devil's advocate argument is that government could be wanting to make wearing a mask a habit among people, and those driving around have a greater responsibility, especially the affluent, in this c...

      By Ashish Rai
      /
    • Vaccines not much helpful post Omicron infections

      The additive benefit of vaccination with Omicron infection for neutralizing antibodies as compared with infection alone is much lower anticipated protection across all variants, including Omicron i...

      By Harsimran Kaur
      /
    • Open up booster for 45+ instead of 60+

      Last year in March, when the vaccination was opened up for the common citizens, it was for the age of 45 and above. All those above 45 (including 60+) living in a house, who wanted to get vaccinate...

      By Padmanabhan G
      /
    • NeoCov - 1 in 3 dies

      Sorry I am the bearer of bad news. Scientists from China’s Wuhan have warned of a new type of coronavirus NeoCov in South Africa with high daeth and transmission rate

      By Sangita Baruah
      /
    • AEFI system that works

      This attached is from hometown Raipur. A 34 year Police Inspector dies within 60 hours of Covishield. Why has the Government not implemented a robust system to track Adverse Events.

      By Mala Sehgal
      /
Share
Enter your email and mobile number and we will send you the instructions

Note - The email can sometime gets delivered to the spam folder, so the instruction will be send to your mobile as well

All My Circles
Invite to
(Maximum 500 email ids allowed.)