Tips for Supporting a Loved One with Cancer

For someone living with cancer, the support of family and friends is critical in their journey. Yet, a diagnosis of cancer often catches everyone by surprise, and shifts the roles we are accustomed to playing. Those of us that have not personally struggled with cancer, though well meaning, are unable to understand completely what our loved one is going through emotionally and physically. As we face this new territory, what are some tips we can use to help support our loved one through their often-lonely journey?

1. Consciously Listen
Simply listening to someone with cancer may sound easy, but is often times surprisingly hard. We want to make things better. We want to fix things. But a listening ear is often what ‘helps’ the most. Let your loved one express their feelings, even if those feelings make you uncomfortable. You can be fairly certain that if your loved one brings up a difficult topic, such as dying, they have been thinking about it. Allow them the opportunity to have the comfort of sharing. Don’t judge, don’t interrupt, and listen with your eyes and body, not only your ears.

2. Deal with Your Own Feelings First
As caregivers, we are faced with our own set of difficult emotions and fears. What will happen to my loved one? Will they have pain? Will they live? What will happen to me? How will my life change? Try to face your own fears first, so you are truly able to reach out to them.

3. Say “I Love You” Often
No matter how much your actions express your love, it is not a substitute for hearing it. Affirm them. Praise their efforts. Even if the only thing they can do after a round of chemotherapy is brush their teeth, let them know they are special and valued.

4. Lend a Hand
For those with lung cancer, life goes on despite running for treatment and side effects like fatigue. Bills accumulate. Dust gathers. Something as simple as offering to help cleaning the house for an hour is often deeply appreciated. Offer help and make it specific. Don’t wait for your loved one to ask for help.

5. Go with Them to Appointments
Attending appointments with your loved one can express your caring in many ways. Hospitals and clinics can be frightening places and waiting can be excruciating. Bring a notepad. Ask questions. Take notes. But make sure to allow your loved ones to make their own decisions.

6. Add a Touch of Humor
Humor can be the best medicine. Be sensitive to the times that your loved one needs to express grief, but be ready to laugh and smile with them as well.

7. Respect Their Need to Be Alone
Sometimes our loved ones with cancer claim they want to be alone so they don’t bother us, but other times, they truly want to be alone. Monitor other visitors as well. Gently let the other visitors know when your loved one appears tired and thank them for visiting.

8. Don’t Hide Things from Them or Other Loved Ones
Our loved ones with lung cancer need an honest assessment of their condition to make decisions that best fit their needs – even if that honesty is painful. Be honest with other family members, and especially children. We want to protect our children from the reality of what their parent or grandparent may be facing, but children often imagine the worst. Even if the prognosis is poor, sharing with them honestly gives them the opportunity to express their love.

9. Gatherer Useful Information
Having information appears to ease some of the anxiety those with cancer face. Research your loved ones disease online, ask your cancer centre for information, take notes, and ask questions at doctors’ appointments.

10. Take Care of Yourself
Eating healthy, trying to get enough sleep, and maintaining a balance in your own life, will help you provide the support your loved one needs. more  

View all 6 comments Below 6 comments
Yes good advice in terminal cases, I advise about will, it has to be written, all accounts, financial matters have to be taken care of very diplomatically. Talk to patient lovingly. Care givers job requires patience, tact, emotional control of self etc

Best regards

S Paintal


On Dec 27, 2013, at 16:00, Sakshi Kharbanda <support@localcirclesmail.com> wrote:

>
>
>
> Sakshi Kharbanda
> Sakshi Kharbanda posted a message in "Cancer Awareness and Support in Delhi/NCR".
> Tips for Supporting a Loved One with Cancer
>
> For someone living with cancer, the support of family and friends is critical in their journey. Yet, a diagnosis of cancer often catches everyone by surprise, and shifts the roles we are accustomed to playing. Those of us that have not personally struggled with cancer, though well meaning, are unable to understand completely what our loved one is going through emotionally and physically. As we face this new territory, what are some tips we can use to help support our loved one through their often-lonely journey?
>
> 1. Consciously Listen
> Simply listening to someone with cancer may sound easy, but is often times surprisingly hard. We want to make things better. We want to fix things. But a listening ear is often what ‘helps’ the most. Let your loved one express their feelings, even if those feelings make you uncomfortable. You can be fairly certain that if your loved one brings up a difficult topic, such as dying, they have been thinking about it. Allow them the opportunity to have the comfort of sharing. Don’t judge, don’t interrupt, and listen with your eyes and body, not only your ears.
>
> 2. Deal with Your Own Feelings First
> As caregivers, we are faced with our own set of difficult emotions and fears. What will happen to my loved one? Will they have pain? Will they live? What will happen to me? How will my life change? Try to face your own fears first, so you are truly able to reach out to them.
>
> 3. Say “I Love You” Often
> No matter how much your actions express your love, it is not a substitute for hearing it. Affirm them. Praise their efforts. Even if the only thing they can do after a round of chemotherapy is brush their teeth, let them know they are special and valued.
>
> 4. Lend a Hand
> For those with lung cancer, life goes on despite running for treatment and side effects like fatigue. Bills accumulate. Dust gathers. Something as simple as offering to help cleaning the house for an hour is often deeply appreciated. Offer help and make it specific. Don’t wait for your loved one to ask for help.
>
> 5. Go with Them to Appointments
> Attending appointments with your loved one can express your caring in many ways. Hospitals and clinics can be frightening places and waiting can be excruciating. Bring a notepad. Ask questions. Take notes. But make sure to allow your loved ones to make their own decisions.
>
> 6. Add a Touch of Humor
> Humor can be the best medicine. Be sensitive to the times that your loved one needs to express grief, but be ready to laugh and smile with them as well.
>
> 7. Respect Their Need to Be Alone
> Sometimes our loved ones with cancer claim they want to be alone so they don’t bother us, but other times, they truly want to be alone. Monitor other visitors as well. Gently let the other visitors know when your loved one appears tired and thank them for visiting.
>
> 8. Don’t Hide Things from Them or Other Loved Ones
> Our loved ones with lung cancer need an honest assessment of their condition to make decisions that best fit their needs – even if that honesty is painful. Be honest with other family members, and especially children. We want to protect our children from the reality of what their parent or grandparent may be facing, but children often imagine the worst. Even if the prognosis is poor, sharing with them honestly gives them the opportunity to express their love.
>
> 9. Gatherer Useful Information
> Having information appears to ease some of the anxiety those with cancer face. Research your loved ones disease online, ask your cancer centre for information, take notes, and ask questions at doctors’ appointments.
>
> 10. Take Care of Yourself
> Eating healthy, trying to get enough sleep, and maintaining a balance in your own life, will help you provide the support your loved one needs.
> Reply Reply to this email to post a comment.
>
> If you believe that this post is inappropriate for this Circle, Click Here to report it.
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Good one and nice to share more  
i read your tips  for supporting..... with great interest very moral and good advices.thanks a lot



On Friday, December 27, 2013 1:30 PM, Sakshi Kharbanda <support@localcirclesmail.com> wrote: more  
Thanks for the the Tips.
What you have narrated is very correct. Family support is very essential. more  
Thank you Shakshi for sharing the tips... can we use this info further? more  
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